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San Diego County

Stretching from the border with Mexico north to San Mateo Point, San Diego County’s 76 miles of shoreline encompass a diversity of terrains, from broad sandy beaches to lush wetlands, rocky bluffs, coastal terraces, landscaped parklands, and urban beach promenades. The southern part of the county in particular provides a multitude of accessible recreational opportunities. You can see many species of shorebirds and waterbirds in the marshes of Tijuana Slough National Wildlife Refuge, just north of the border, take an exhilarating nine-mile ride along Coronado's Silver Strand, or learn about the region’s history at Cabrillo National Monument on Point Loma. Close to downtown San Diego, you can join the throngs of shoppers and diners along Pacific Beach promenade or cruise the miles of paved bike paths through landscaped Mission Bay Park, stopping for a picnic or to watch kiteboarders in action.

Farther north, enjoy the sand and surf at Torrey Pines State Beach with a beach wheelchair, or visit the nearby nature reserve to see the rarest pine tree in the United States; look for osprey at San Elijo Lagoon near Cardiff; or fish off Oceanside’s long Art Deco-style wooden pier. Most of the county’s coastline north of Oceanside lies within the U.S. Marine Corps’ Camp Pendleton and is off-limits to the public.  

 

 

Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve (Kristen Meneke)
Torrey Pines State Natural ReserveCabrillo National MonumentCoronado City BeachMission Beach
Access Norhtern California This web guide is a project of Access Northern California.   California Coastal Conservancy Thanks to our partner the California Coastal Conservancy

DISCLAIMER: Although the information contained in this web-guide was believed to be correct at the time of publication, neither Access Northern California nor California Coastal Conservancy shall be held responsible or liable for any inaccuracies, errors, or omissions, nor for information that changes or becomes outdated. Neither Access Northern California nor California Coastal Conservancy assume any liability for any injury or damage arising out of, or in connection with, any use of this guide or the sites described in it.

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